English skill building test 3 — for South Asian students appearing competitive tests

December 27, 2012 at 1:33 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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English test 3 ——-

a. Make sentences with ….. (1×45 =45 marks)

Spiral out of control,   Hegemony,   Sleuth,   Reign supreme,   Contingent (both meanings), Fume as verb,   Marginalize,   Ruminate,   Reticent,   Prevaricate,   Slight as noun and verb, Affront,   Confront,   Confabulation,   Capricious,   Abort,   August as adjective,   Aura, Bestow,   Rekindle,   Ambush,   Rhetoric,   Ramification,   Cacophony,   Path-breaking, Collude,   Elude,   Holocaust,   Rant,   Aggrieved,   Austere,   Nauseating,   Retract,   Revoke, Invoke,   Provoke,   Pugnacious,   Piety,   Lumbering,   Largesse,   Reverberate,   Raunchy

b. Fill in the words — (2×10= 10 marks)

a. Pandit Ravishankar used to get ———– welcome from his Sitar-loving fans wherever he went in America. (exuberant, effusive, unbridled)

b. Many people believe in the ——- properties of bitter Neem leaves for diabetes. (panacea, curative, mitigating)

c. Smoke started coming out of the plane’s engine when it was seconds away from take-off. Seeing this, the alert pilot ———– (botched, aborted, dropped) the flight.

d. Lucy wants to write well, but her efforts ———— due to lack of adequate vocabulary. (struggled, sluggish, floundered)

e. A boy of marginalized section of the society is more likely to come to school hungry. He is also more likely to be a ——— in academic performance. (back-bencher, laggard, lethargic)

f. India has huge reserves of coal. It is —– that it has emerged as the largest importer of coal. (ironic, impractical, obvious)

g. The girl’s black luxurious hair ———- down to her waist. Her poet-husband wrote a poem in praise of her hair. She was clearly flattered. (flew, cascaded, came)

h. The burly-looking man ——— the girl on the dark bend of the lonely road. She felt both awkward and frightened. She gave her a very angry glance. (accosted, molested, browbeat)

i. If you ——— a knife in a public place for whatever reason, you are sure to attract the hostile attention of the policeman on duty. (flag, brandish, shove)

j. The European economic crisis has robbed many European leaders of their sleep. As it appears, the ———- will continue to torment the continent for at least a week. (Countdown, conundrum, cacophony)

c. Short comprehension questions …. (2×5 =10 marks)

a. Why is Jerusalem such a contentious city?

b. How does the RBI restrict sharp and unusual rise or fall of the value of the rupee?

c. What is the meaning of your name? Why do you like your own name?

d. Name three persons in the world who like you most. Why do they like you so much?

e. Why are rivers so important for us?

d. Join the following sentences … (3×5=15 marks)

a. When we go out to buy cloth, we go to more than one shop. We look for the best cloth. We look for the cheapest cloth. We bargain before we buy.

b. Red meat is useful for body. It is harmful too. Doctors proscribe it for elders. Instead, they prescribe small fish.

c. The Himalays are majestic. They are the best natural bulwark against the cold Siberian winds. Without the Hamalayas India would have become a very inhospitable place to live.

d. Green peas are packaged by Nature. Their packing pattern is beautiful. The pattern is compact. Children find great pleasure in peeling the peas.

e. Rape is a nefarious manifestation of male lust. Some say girls invite it by their dress and manners. We must not be ambivalent in condoning a rapist.

e. Comprehension questions … (4×5 =20 marks)

a. Why we must have cities?

b. Why India must invest more in education?

c. Why privatizing water supply may be a good idea?

d. Why privatizing water supply is a bad idea?

——————————————————————————————–END——————————————————————————————

Post your answers to broadbase.knowledge@gmail.com for free evaluation. (for the first 20 answers only)

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Fast-track English and Current Affairs skill building programme -teast 2

December 22, 2012 at 7:51 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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English skill-building test 2 –

(Time 4 hours. Use of internet, dictionary and newspaper allowed.)

Make sentences with ——- (2 marks each x 20= 40 marks)

Reprisal, Viable, Maverick, Sprawling, Surreptitious, Sanguine, Revile, Rancid, Revulsion, Descent, Decent, Regal, Spendthrift, Thwart, Botch, Bovine, Nefarious, Discrete, Decrepit, Maestro

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Fill in the blanks with the appropriate words … (1 mark x 9 = 9 marks)
(Attempt any nine.)

a. Birds from the cold Siberia ———- long distances to find temporary sanctuary in the warmer climes of the Chilika Lake. (Traverse, Migrate, Move)

b. The manager of the hotel was a —– character. He misbehaved with the customers, ill-treated his staff and stole the hotel’s rations. In due course, he was fired by the owners. (De-motivated, Dastardly, Hideous)

c. When Sita reached Lord Rama’s court to present her two twin sons, Lava and Kusha for the first time to their father, he refused to acknowledge them. This caused great ———— (guilt, indignation, annoyance)

d. The opening of a government hospital in the tribal areas will go a long way to ———— the grievances of these marginalized people. (banish, mitigate, alleviate)

e. Rain water harvesting is a great environment protection idea. If implemented sincerely, it will prove to be a ———- in water-starved urban settlements. (bane, benefit, boon)

f. Due to the persistent refusal of the environment authorities to accord clearance, the club management’s plans to build an in-door, all-weather swimming pool inside its premises ———-, making the management to shelve the plan. (hurdled, ran into rough weather, hampered)

g. The unity in the village was in jeopardy due to the un-ending feud between the blacksmiths community and the carpenter community. The Sarpanch made an attempt to bring the two communities together as the ———- between them loomed. (standoff, dissonance, disparate)

h. The man had two wives, Anuradha and Anusaya living with him under the same roof. Each tried to outdo the other in swaying the man to her side. The first wife, Anuradha went to her parents place for a few days. In her absence, Anusaya ——— over her, but to little effect. (riddled, poured scorn, ridiculed)

i. The High Court had firmly asked the government to provide free nutritious mid-day meals for the school students. It was found that the government had dragged its feet over the matter and implemented the programme half-heartedly. The High Court took ————- to the government apathy in the matter. (took umbrage, discomfort, displeasure)

j. There was considerable discord in the family over the sharing of paternal property. The daughters wanted some part of the property, where as the sons did not want to cede anything to them. Fortunately, the deceased father had left a will. The contending claimants decided to approach the family lawyer to read out the will and ———–.  (remove doubts, clear the air, mediate)

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Comprehension questions … (5 marks x3 =15marks)

Read the following articles from The Hindu, dated December, 21.

a. India wants deeper engagement with ASEAN, says Manmohan
b. Restricting fiscal deficit to 5.3% of GDP is doable: Chidambaram
c. New Dreamliners for five routes

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1. Explain why ASEAN is so important for India.
2. Explain why restricting fiscal deficit is important for India
3. What are Dreamliners? Why are they being bought?

——————————-..—————————————

Join the following sentences. (2 mark x3 = 6 marks)

a. Ashis loves Priyambada. Priyambada loves Ajit. This makes Ashis seethe in anger against Ashis.
b. Bees form an important part of the eco-system. Humans often do not realize this. They feel bees protect their bee-hives too jealously.
c. The captain wanted to take four spinners. The vice-captain wanted to include three spinners. They differed sharply over this matter. They did not like the public to know about their difference of opinion.

———————————–..——————————

Short questions for comprehension …. (5 marks x 6= 30 marks)

 

a. What does a diplomat do for his country?
b. What does a good ‘home-maker’ do for her family?
c. What does a nurse do inside the operation theatre?
d. What does an air traffic controller do in an airport?
e. What does the RAW do?
f. What does the IB do?

————————————–..———————-END——————————–..———–

 

Answers to the previous exercise —Common errors in English of South Asian students

December 20, 2012 at 10:29 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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English proficiency test—-

Correct the mistakes, if any, in the following sentences. (There may or may not be mistakes. So, judge carefully.)

Answers in red

a. The book, which my father, presented to me on my birthday has, unfortunately been lost. — Correct. This sentence needs no change.

b. The river, that flows by our village, is polluted by effluents from a nearby factory. Wrong. Omit commas from the sentence.
Corrected answer — The river that flows by our village is polluted by effluents from a nearby factory.

c. In western countries, wives call their husbands in their first names. Wrong. Write ‘by’ in place of ‘in’.
Corrected answer —– In western countries, wives call their husbands by their names.

d. Sukanya is Sanjay’s daughter from his second wife. Wrong. Write ‘by’ in place of ‘in’.
Corrected answer —– Sukanya is Sanjay’s daughter by his second wife.

e. Manmohan Singh often completed his studies in street light. Wrong. Write ‘by’ in place of ‘in’.
Corrected answer —- Manmohan Singh often studied by street light.

f. The laborer got Rs. 200 a day as wages. He multiplied it with 365 with to calculate his annual income. Wrong. Write ‘by’ in place of ‘with’.
Corrected answer — The labourer got Rs. 200 a day as wages. He multiplied it by 365 to calculate his annual earnings.

g. The husband and wife were discussing their picnic plan. The wife lovingly told him, “Anything you do is alright to me.” Wrong. Write ‘by’ in place of ‘to’.
Corrected answer — The husband and wife were discussing their picnic plan. The wife lovingly told him, “Anything you do is alright by me.”

h. I have visited the Jagannath Temple last weekend. Wrong. Omit ‘have’.
Corrected answer — I visited the Jagannath Temple last weekend.

i. I look forward to meet you in Delhi. Wrong. Write ‘meeting’ in place of ‘meet’.
Corrected answer — I look forward to meeting you in Delhi.

j. The tourist asked the shop-keeper, “Where I can find a bank?” Wrong. Change the position of ‘can’.
Corrected answer —– The tourist asked the shop-keeper, “Where can I find a bank?”
When the sentence is in the form of a question, use the proper sequence by putting ‘can’ ahead of the verb ‘find’ to ensure grammatical correctness.

 

k. The nurse assured the new doctor saying, “This place is quite peaceful. I have been here since three months.” Wrong. Write ‘for’ in place of ‘since’.
Corrected answer —– The nurse assured the new doctor saying, “This place is quite peaceful. I have been here for six months.”

l. The host asked the guest, “Do you like to have some black coffee after dinner.” Wrong. Write, “Would you like to have….”.
Corrected answer — The host asked the guest, “Would you like to have some black coffee after dinner?”

m. The father pulled up his son saying, “You can’t buy all what you like.” Wrong. Write ‘that’ in place of ‘what’.
Corrected answer —- The father pulled up his son saying, “You can’t have all that you like.”

n. Me and my friend went to the book store. Wrong. Bring ‘my father’ forward.”
Corrected answer —– My father and I went to the book store.”

o. Lucy said, “I go always to school by this way.” Wrong. Change the position of ‘always’.
Corrected answer —- Lucy said, “I always go to school by this way.”

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Common errors in English — How South Asian students ruin their writing

December 18, 2012 at 8:10 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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English proficiency test

Correct the mistakes, if any, in the following sentences. (There may or may not be mistakes. So, judge carefully.)

a. The book, which my father, presented to me on my birthday has, unfortunately been lost.

b. The river, that flows by our village, is polluted by effluents from a nearby factory.

c. In western countries, wives call their husbands in their first names.

d. Sukanya is Sanjay’s daughter from his second wife.

e. Manmohan Singh often completed his studies in street light.

f. The labourer got Rs. 200 a day as wages. He multiplied it with 365 with to calculate his annual income.

g. The husband and wife were discussing their picnic plan. The wife loving told him, “Anything you do is alright to me.”

h. I have visited the Jagannath Temple last weekend.

i. I look forward to meet you in Delhi.

j. The tourist asked the shop-keeper, “Where I can find a bank?”

k. The nurse assured the new doctor saying, “This place is quite peaceful. I have been here since three months.”

l. The host asked the guest, “Do you like to have some black coffee after dinner.”

m. The father pulled up his son saying, “You can’t buy what you like.”

n. Me and my friend went to the book store.

o. Lucy said, “I go always to school by this way.”

——————Answers will be posted tomorrow.————————

Ailing handloom sector of India demands government sops

December 14, 2012 at 2:58 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Looming crisis in Handloom sector in India

As a profession for providing employment, textile sector occupies the second place, next to agriculture. Thus, it becomes the second biggest employment generator in the country. Sadly, the government has shown utter apathy to this sector. Its policies have been far from conducive to nurture this sector.

 

Jantar Mantar, the traditional protest ground in the national capital Delhi, has seen scores of harassed handloom workers converge on it for a 72-hour Bandh. It is being staged by weavers (tiny handloom entrepreneurs) from the states of Andhra, Orissa, Chhatisgarh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Uttar Pradesh.

 

 

Adequate budget allocation and adoption of helpful policies come in the top of the agenda of the vast weaving community represented by the agitating weavers. The protest is intended to influence the parliamentarians and the government during the winter session of the parliament. The protesters intend to bring their plight into focus before the next Budget Session. In the country, one out of 12 households earns its bread and butter from the weaving trade. It is tragic that such a large source of livelihood goes abegging for funds due to inadequate budgetary support from the government.

 

 

Mancherla Mohan Rao, the President of the National Handloom Weavers Union claims that this sector, enfeebled by years of Government neglect, has imperiled the very survival of one out of 60 households in the country. So high has been the distress level in this sick sector.

 

 

Back-breaking debts and blood-sucking intermediaries ..

 

The handloom industry has been beset with a plethora of problems. The tiny, vulnerable weavers have not been able to weather the hostile climate brought in by the aggressive push towards globalization. Consequently, scores of weavers have been pushed too far into the edge. Many of these cases have resulted in suicides. The humiliation of un-paid debts has driven many once-proud weavers to this drastic step of desperation. By a rough estimate, as many as 1000 weavers have chosen to end their lives in 2002 in Andhra Pradesh alone.

 

As per the statistics compiled by National Handloom Census of 2009-10, the ongoing crisis in the weaving trade has pushed 60% of them below the poverty line. Aggravating their crisis is the entry of intermediaries into the trade, who buy the finished products, sell the raw materials and provide loans to the weavers timely, but at very high rates of interest.

 

Nearly 80% of the weavers are tethering on the edge of survival and destruction as a result of taking un-sustainable loans from the intermediaries. The crisis started to assume alarming proportions around the 1980’s when the winds of change brought in by promotion of globalization began to unsettle the sector. The first catastrophic result was a sharp rise in the cost of inputs.

 

Mechanization rings the death bell ..

Advent of machines in the textile trade is an age-old phenomenon. It had started in the early years of British colonial rule. Handloom trade is essentially a manual operation which can not afford to compete with machines in productivity and cost-cutting. So, with each step of advancement of mechanization of the textile trade, the distress of the handloom weavers has grown.

 

To counter this, governments had to step in to provide some sort of subsidies to this sector. At the same time, the textile mills, which are highly mechanized and automated, also fell into bad times throwing thousands of workers in the organized sector out of jobs. The government stepped in quite aggressively to protect the distressed mills by giving them loans to modernize their machines and market their products.

 

The handloom sector, however, has not been so lucky. The handloom sector produces nearly 25% of all the cloths produced in the country, but receives just 5% of the government’s spending on the textile sector.

 

The idea of ‘reservation’ …

 

What the handloom weavers most fervently demand is a ‘Handloom Reservation Act’ that will prevent the mechanized sector from duplicating the products and the designs of the handloom trade. They also need the government to assure them steady supply of inputs like yarn and dyes at reasonable costs. Besides these, the weavers need higher allocation of government funds for their trade.

 

The government has tried to orient the handloom trade and align it with the international market. This approach is flawed. This is because the handloom trade is deeply rooted to the local culture. The policy makers must not lose sight of this fact.

 

A prudent policy shift in the handloom sector might instill some life into the handloom sector. In turn, it can alleviate the looming unemployment crisis in the country.

 

It is hoped the Jantar Mantar protests will pave the way for such a change.

 

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Introduction to Sociology for CBSC students in India

December 14, 2012 at 1:45 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Explanation of the terms

Stereotyping,

Ghettoization,

Radicalization,

Marginalization

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Stereotyping ..

This is the verb form of the word ‘Stereotype’.

It is a widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular type of person or thing.

Examples … In our society, some of us  often see Muslims as backward, illiterate and dirty. They think Muslims have more loyalty to Pakistan than to India. Some among us also suspect that Muslims tend to have large families with 5 to 7 offspring so that, one day, they can outnumber the Hindus to make India a Muslim country. More sinisterly, quite a good number of us think that each one of the Muslims is either an active terrorist or is someone having sympathy towards terrorism.

All these ideas are utterly false.

If you see a little carefully, Muslims have made a name for themselves in sports, science, music, cinema, politics and bureaucracy. Compared to their share of the population, their contribution in these areas of creative intellectual activity is disproportionately and significantly high. See, out of 11 cricketers in the national team, how many are Muslims. Look at the number of ‘Khans’ among the top actors in cinema. See how Abdul Kalam has contributed to science, politics and education. So, how can we paint all the Muslims as dangerous, backward and anti-national? No doubt, some Muslims have been found to be behind recent terror attacks in India. In the same vein, some respectable Hindus have been arrested for involvement in terrorism, smuggling, spying and other anti-national activities.

So, to portray the entire Muslim community as obnoxious will be a serious distortion of facts and truth. Those who engage in such distortion of facts engage in ‘stereotyping’ of Muslims.

Another example … We often think that Chirstian girls have loose morals. They eat beef and pork, and therefore, are dirty. They engage in pre-marital sex too easily and frequently. This is nothing but ‘stereotyping’ of the Christian community.

People resort to stereotyping because of the following reasons…

a. Ignorance about the community or the person they have in mind

b. Prejudice against the community

c. Feeling of anger or revenge against their target

d. Political expediency

Ignorant and vindictive people clinging to such erroneous beliefs against an individual or community cause a lot misunderstanding between the majority and minority communities. People of minority communities feel hurt and humiliated. They get angry and often express their anger through violent means.

People of a healthy democracy must avoid ‘stereotyping’ of any community.

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Ghettoization …

In American cities and towns, Negros (Now called ‘African-Americans’) live in a group in congested areas where housing is cheap with less number of schools, hospitals or any such civic amenities. Their rooms are cramped as too many inmates live in each room. General sanitation in the area is poor. Crime rates are high. Because there are too few schools, the young ones do not get proper education. As a result, they do not get high-paying jobs. Even getting low-paying jobs becomes difficult for them.

High unemployment among the younger population forces them to take to petty crimes. They get caught and are jailed. After serving a jail term, they emerge more angry, frustrated and more prone to crime.

The areas where they live are known as ‘ghettos’. Average white Americans generally avoid these African Americans. They do not get decent housing even if they can afford it. At times, white-skinned hooligans and even the police bully them. As a result, the Afican Americans feel insecured. They choose to live near the people of their own skin colour. They come and settle in the ghettos. The size of the ghetto grows.

This process of social seclusion of minority and poor people to specific areas of a city or town is called ‘ghettoization’. These people tend to think alike on social and political matters. Such mindset is called ‘ghetto mentality’.

This term of ‘ghettoization’ and ‘ghetto mentality is equally applicable to India’s social and political environment. In cities like Bangalore, students from north-east live close to each other for a sense of security. Muslims, too, live in certain areas. They vote as one bloc in elections, although other options are available. These are examples ‘Ghettoization’ and ‘ghetto mentality’.

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Radicalization

When some people are harassed, persecuted, humiliated and deprived of dignity, they get angry and try to vent their frustration through protest. If the political and social climate stifles their voices of protest, they get more angry. They become radicalized and seek redressal through extremist routes like political assassination, terrorism, and other such violent activities. At times, gullible young men and women are radicalized by sinister hate-mongers who appear as spiritual mentors.

Azmal Kasab was a good example of such ‘implanted’ radicalization. Radical elements are a threat to democracy and to society. Hitler plunged his country in such a destructive war by radicalizing vast numbers of his own countrymen.

Pakistan has fallen victim to this phenomenon of ‘radicalization’. As a result, we see so many active terrorists or terrorism sympathizers in that country. The madrashas there are the breeding grounds for gurus and deciples of the ideas of ‘radicalization’.

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Marginalization

This is a process of social seclusion by which people of certain religious or ethnic groups get pushed away from the mainstream. As a result, they fail to fully enjoy their legitimate share of what their country offers in the areas of education, employment, healthcare and other such welfare measures.

The more they are marginalized, the more difficult they find it to regain their share of the society’s wealth, progress and welfare benefits. As a result, these marginalized groups languish as voice-less, poor and deprived people.

In India, Muslims and Adivasi groups are the most marginalized. People from the north east are marginalized, but to a much smaller extent. In America, African Americans are marginalized despite all the laws to integrate them to the mainstream society.

For a democracy, having some people as ‘marginalized’ is a blot (black mark).

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Join sentences for comprehension and precis writing skill building

December 10, 2012 at 2:31 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Join the following sentences ….

Question 1 —The potter produced beautiful artifacts. The cobbler made beautiful shoes. They were good artisans. Together, the two brothers had good business. Buyers lined up to buy their goods. They came from far-off places.

Answer 1—-The two artisan brothers, one excelling in pottery and the other in leather work, did good business with buyers from far-off places lining up for buying their products.
Or
Answer 1A —– Buyers from far-off places lined up to buy the high-quality potteries and shoes from the two artisan brothers, one adept in pottery and the other in shoe-making, and thus, the duo got good business.

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Question 2 —The patient was felt unbearable pain. He was lying in the hospital. There was no doctor on duty then. The nurse tried her best to alleviate his suffering. She failed.

Answer 2 —- In the absence of the doctor in the hospital, the nurse tried hard to bring relief to the patient suffering excruciating pain, but her efforts were in vain.
Or
Answer 2A —–The doctor was absent in the hospital, and the nurse tried her best to lessen the patient’s unbearable pain, but nothing worked.

—————————————————..

Question 3 —– The kite flew in the sky. It was deep red in colour. The brother and sister watched it in delight. They could not take their eyes off the kite. The kite rose higher and higher in the sky.

Answer 3 —– The brother and sister duo delightfully watched the bright red kite soaring into the sky.
Or
Answer 3A —— The bright-red kite soared into the sky bringing great joy to the brother and sister.

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Question 4 —— Tuberculosis makes the patient weak and infirm. It is almost like AIDS. AIDS enfeebles the patient. Modern science has found cures for both. These treatments are within the reach of the average person.

 

Answer 4 —- Modern science has brought affordable cures for debilitating diseases like Tuberculosis and AIDS.
Or
Answer 4A — The average man can now have cures for debilitating diseases like Tuberculosis and AIDS, because of the findings of modern science.

 

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Question 5 —- Red meat is harmful for health. Small fish is not harmful for humans. Doctors recommend eating small fish for sick people. It is good for recuperating patients.

Answer 5 — Doctors recommend eating small fish for recuperating patients, but forbid red meat for its harmful effects.
Or
Answer 5A — Red meat is harmful where as small fish is beneficial, and this is why doctors recommend the latter for recuperating patients.

 

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Join sentences exercises — For comprehension and precis writing skill building

December 9, 2012 at 5:11 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Join the following sentences, using alternate words wherever needed. …..

a. The potter produced beautiful artifacts. The cobbler made beautiful shoes. They were good artisans. Together, the two brothers had good business. Buyers lined up to buy their goods. They came from far-off places.

b. The patient was felt unbearable pain. He was lying in the hospital. There was no doctor on duty then. The nurse tried her best to alleviate his suffering. She failed.

c. The kite flew in the sky. It was deep red in colour. The brother and sister watched it in delight. They could not take their eyes off the kite. The kite rose higher and higher in the sky.

d. Tuberculosis makes the patient weak and infirm. It is almost like AIDS. AIDS enfeebles the patient. Modern science has found cures for both. These treatments are within the reach of the average person.

e. Red meat is harmful for health. Small fish is not harmful for humans. Doctors recommend eating small fish for sick people. It is good for recuperating patients.

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Comprehension exercises for learning precis writing — Joining sentences with answer

December 8, 2012 at 4:58 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Join the following sentences …

Question 1. The crow was thirsty. It looked around for water. But the land was parched. It flew for some time. Finally, it dropped dead out of exhaustion.

Answer 1— After flying over the parched land for some time looking for water, the thirsty crow dropped dead out of exhaustion.

Or,

Answer 2 — Due to exhaustion, the thirsty crow dropped dead after flying over the parched land for sometime in search of water.

 

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Question 2. The election was drawing close. The party office saw frenzied activity. Pot-bellied politicians darted in and out of the office. The gardener was not amused a bit. He had seen many such elections come and go. His lot never changed.

Answer — In the build-up to the elections, the party office saw frenzied activity with pot-bellied politicians darting in and out of the office, but the gardener was not amused a bit as he had seen many such elections come and go bringing little change to his lot.

 

———————-..——————————————————————————

Question 3. The Fukushima disaster took some wind out of the sail of the nuclear power supporters. The opponents of nuclear power got fresh ammunition to fire at the pro-nuclear lobby. A lively debate raged on. (Use your own terminology to express the sense.)

Answer 1 —- In the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster, a lively debate raged on with pro-nuclear groups on the back foot and anti-nuclear lobby emboldened.

Or,

Answer 2— The Fukushima disaster weakened the pro-nuclear lobby and emboldened the anti-nuclear group giving rise to a lively debate.

Or,

Answer 3 —– A lively debate raged on with the pro-nuclear lobby ceding considerable ground to pronuclear groups in the wake of the Fukushima disaster.

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Question 4. Europe’s economy is in a shambles. The countries struggle to get back to their feet. The people have to endure great hardship. Their patience gets stretched. (Use your own terminology to express the sense.)

Answer —- As a result of enduring great hardship, the patience of Europeans wears thin as they struggle to breathe life into their moribund economies.

 

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Question 5. —- Mother’s milk is the best food for a baby in the world. Unicef goes to great lengths to propagate this idea. It has recruited eminent persons as its goodwill ambassadors.

Answer — As part of its vigorous efforts to spread the idea of primacy of mother’s milk for a baby, Unicef has recruited eminent persons as its goodwill ambassadors.

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Quick steps to learn comprehension –Sentence joining exercises

December 5, 2012 at 3:21 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Join the following sentences …

1. The crow was thirsty. It looked around for water. But the land was parched. It flew for some time. Finally, it dropped dead out of exhaustion.

2. The election was drawing close. The party office saw frenzied activity. Pot-bellied politicians darted in and out of the office. The gardener was not amused a bit. He had seen many such elections come and go. His lot never changed.

3. The Fukushima disaster took some wind out of the sail of the nuclear power supporters. The opponents of nuclear power got fresh ammunition to fire at the pro-nuclear lobby. A lively debate raged on. (Use your own terminology to express the sense.)

4. Europe’s economy is in a shambles. The countries struggle to get back to their feet. The people have to endure great hardship. Their patience gets stretched. (Use your own terminology to express the sense.)

5. Mother’s milk is the best food for a baby in the world. Unicef goes to great lengths to propagate this idea. It has recruited eminent persons as its goodwill ambassadors.

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